Shared concerns

Over at blog.baby-wise.com, there was an entry a couple weeks back that I just picked up over a Technorati search on preschool bullies.  The question posed there is:  How does your preschooler behave in school?   

 Well there’s the rub, eh?  How do you know how your preschooler behaves in school?  I assume I’m like most parents in admitting that I really don’t know.  I hope my son’s teachers will tell me when he’s been out of line, but otherwise, I believe that he’s going to behave at school in much the same way he behaves at home, and for some reason I believe maybe he’s going to behave a little better.  I have no reason to believe this.  I’ve not watched a session of him at school. 

I’m acting on a warped system of faith here. 

Anyway, the concern over at blog.baby-wise.com was linked to the ABC report on the Yale study  from the Detroit Free Press on preschool expulsions that I discovered in a South Bend Tribune piece. 

ABC’s report is eye-opening.  I’m not surprised with its case of Janine Butler who was threatened with knives, scratched and hit.  I was a camp counselor for special needs adolescents for several summers and had a young man scratch my wrists with his fingernails until he was pulled off.  His mental capacity was probably along the lines of that of a toddler, so there were no hard feelings until he came back the next day and tried it again. 

What are you supposed to do in a situation like that?  “Author Walter Gilliam, director of the Zigler Center in Child Development and Social Policy, told ABCNEWS.com that he didn’t set out to study preschool expulsions. But when he was analyzing publicly funded prekindergarten policies at 3,898 schools in 40 states, he found expulsion rates three times higher than for older grades.”  That’s a problem, no?  Who’s to blame?  The headline of the piece suggests parents, schools and poverty as potential culprits.  What say you?

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2 Responses to “Shared concerns”

  1. Rick Lang Says:

    Parents and schools, yes, they can take some blame. Poverty? No. There are plenty of bullies at every economic level. Schools obviously have a difficult time trying to monitor and correct behavior that is harmful or inappropriate, but if what they do is not reinforced at home, what good does it do? As you’ve said already, the main solution is in communication between child, parents, and school. And if one of those three doesn’t seem to give a rip, then the problem will not go away.

  2. macoffeegrounds Says:

    I’m inclined to agree with you. The experts may not consider the increasing culture of entitlement afflicting some more affluent members of society that also plays a contributing role. Even that comes down to parents and school and what’s accepted. But, why isn’t that on the radar screen? These are supposedly experts, so why the inclusion of poverty in this scenario?

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